The Email Election Part 3: The Tories

Are the Tories’ emails doing the business?

It’s just one week away from the day the country makes its mind up.

cameronBy all accounts it’s anyone’s call so far. So we wanted to see how the Conservative Party’s email marketing campaigns are performing, in this the third blog in our ‘Email Election’ series.

As with the Lib Dems, we picked two emails sent by the Conservative Party over the last seven days and scored them against a set of criteria based on our ‘Hitting the Mark’ benchmark study.

Check out both the emails here.

The two emails we scored are from party Chairman Eric Pickles and Shadow Chancellor George Osborne.

Whereas the Lib Dems sent one personalised email followed by a newsletter round-up, throughout the campaign the Conservatives’ emails have taken a more consistently personalised approach.

Writing copy for the inbox

The Osborne email arrived on Saturday afternoon and aims to give an overview of how the third week of the campaign played out.

The main problem is, it’s so long – we’re talking 930 words! Worse still, there are no sub-headings or design elements to break up the text and help the reader to scan it.

Inbox attention is short and we think only the most die-hard followers are likely to read this account to the end.

Calls to action lost

The email has some powerful calls to action, but they are hidden as text links below the fold or right at  the foot of the message.  It’s unlikely that the majority of readers will reach this point – we only made it there in the interests of a fair study!

We liked the video links to the party’s YouTube channel, although they could have been used more effectively to drive traffic to a dedicated landing page with more calls to action.

The focus should be above the fold

The Pickles email is slightly less daunting than the Osborne email. Numbered bullets make the text more readable and the calls to action are slightly easier to find.

However, the email is still too lengthy. There’s too much introductory copy before the money copy kicks in.

Two different email approaches then from the Conservatives, but both need to work harder to grab and hold the reader’s attention ‘above the fold’ and give the recipient a reason to read and take action.

The scores

election_tablev3The Conservative party scored 12.5 points our of 25 in this section – a total of 20.5  out of 35 points when added to their previous score. They trail the Lib Dems by 5.5 points .

Can the Labour party take the lead in our email election? Find out in our next post.

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